Architectural Washi Parchment

Feature Wall

Mizushibuki (Water Spray) 3pcs

The room dividers narrate various stories of nature that can be interpreted in several different ways involving the flow of water. The images can be seen as a waterfall empties a body of water, which ends up splashing vigorously at the rocks below. Other stories include rain falling onto land and seeping into the soil. The effect is to bring a more natural-light note into the spaces it’s placed in.

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Mizushibuki (Water Spray)

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Mizushibuki (Water Spray)

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Mizushibuki (Water Spray)

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Mizushibuki (Water Spray)


Pearl

The bubble shapes on the screens, which can also be seen as stacked perforations were designed for Mikimoto, the renowned pearl company. These shapes came in a neutral tan color to further exemplify the pearls pure undertone. Screens were suggested to allow limited amounts of light to flourish in certain areas, giving an added serene feel of mystifying droplets of water.

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Pearl

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Pearl

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Pearl


Iro no Kumo

The Iro No Kumo design or rather , “threaded strands mimicking clouds effect”, is featured through multiple types of mediums and colors. Because each art piece is unique and hand crafted, no two works will be exactly the same, although there may be similarities in design. The represented colors are examples of the range of available colors, however, are not limited to the ones shown below.

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Iro no Kumo

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Iro no Kumo

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Iro no Kumo

 


Rasen-Kumo (Spiral Cloud)

The spiral cloud is a mixture of haphazardly placed lines and circles, making it a combination between the Iro No Kumo and Pearl Washi pieces. However, the pattern in which the circles and lines make can be determined as random, striped, or blocked. Alternative colors are also available upon request.

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Rasen-Kumo (Spiral Cloud)

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Rasen-Kumo (Spiral Cloud)

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Rasen-Kumo (Spiral Cloud)

 

 


Megumi (Blessing)

Megumi, meaning gift, grace, or blessing has an elegant and abstract earthly representation almost to the manner of a halo. Its seemingly haphazard line work is contained within a universally known shape, maintaining a more simplistic yet ornate piece of art. Although, similar to the Iro No Kumo, the Megumi piece formulates itself by the line work without another medium.

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Megumi (Blessing)

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Megumi (Blessing)

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Megumi (Blessing)

 


Fujin-Raijin (black)

The 17th century mythological creatures of Fujin and Raijin are depicted here through its choice of colors and circular composition, as a commemoration to the original painting. The configuration of the circles abstractly emulates the painting, but is a modernized depiction. Similar abstractions can be arranged through color schemes and circle line work density.

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Fujin-Raijin (black)

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Fujin-Raijin (black)

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Fujin-Raijin (black)

 


Illumination Box

 

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Illumination Box

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Illumination Box

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Illumination Box

 


Nobori-Kumo (Rising Cloud)

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Nobori-Kumo (Rising Cloud)

Nobori is a banner the Japanese mainly used during its feudal period for the battle-
field as an indicator to the number of units. The Noborikumo piece is an abstraction of the shape and orientation of the traditional banners with clouds of striped lines. It makes a strong statement to any simple space just as the warriors did in the past.

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Nobori-Kumo (Rising Cloud)

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Nobori-Kumo (Rising Cloud)